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Portland Railways

 

Below are many old pictures of the old Portland railways.

Click on the images to see them full size

 

No. 221 has just run around its train after arrival at Easton, the coaching stock on this occasion being the Bristol Division No. 7'B' set.
A view towards Portland Goods Junction signal box shortly after its opening. An LSWR 0-6-6 locomotive shunts a goods train. To the right can be seen the Royal Navy oil tanks under construction.
Easton station looking south. In the background is the old footbridge leading from the bottom of Channel View into Bloomfield Terrace.

Thanks to Dave Woolford for the information about this picture.

Bomb damage to the line near the Dockyard entrance on 23rd August 1940. Although the Dockyard sidings had been repaired, the Easton line had to wait until more important work had been attended to.
A pre-1900 view of Castletown sidings complete with overhead gantry cranes. Running down the centre can be seen the narrow gauge line and wagons of the 'Merchants Railway'.
The 60 foot long platform adjoining the Naval Hospital situated just beyond Castletown sidings. At the far end of the platform can be seen the girder bridge carrying the Easton line over the 'Merchants' incline.
The end of the line at the top end of Sheepcroft Yard during construction work. After opening the gantry crane was used to load stone onto wagons in the siding below.
An '02' class locomotive pushes stone wagons out of the South Western Stone firm's yard at Quarry Tip Siding back onto the branch towards Easton station. The regulations for working the branch obliged the engine to be at the Portland end of the train to avoid a runaway in the event of a coupling breaking.
Tank engine No. 4624 stands idle in the no longer used Easton station.
This Bulleid Merchant Navy Class No 35018  locomotive, formerly of the British India Line, arrived on Portland in May 2003. 

The locomotive is named "British India Line", but it was never owned by them. It was built by the Southern Railway and passed to British Railways in 1947. It was the first of the class to be rebuilt by BR - originally, the boiler was covered by an "air-smoothed" casing, causing them to be called "spam cans" by railwaymen.

35018 was built in 1945 and was withdrawn from service in August 1964. It arrived in the Woodham Bros scrap yard on Barry Island in South Wales in December 1964 where it stayed for over 15 years until it was bought privately and resided on the Watercress Line in Hampshire in 1983, restoration finally began when it arrived on Portland. It was never owned by the Mid-Hants Railway (Watercress Line).
For more information on the Watercress Line Click Here.

 

35018 All loaded up and ready to leave the Watercress Line bound for Portland.

Photo (12th May 2003): Tony Wood - www.watercressline.co.uk

35018 in the compound at Portland awaiting restoration.

Photo: Andrew Chalmers-Stevens - www.watercressline.co.uk

21C18 / BR 35018 Merchant Navy ‘British India Line’ after she was rebuilt in 1956.
A view of the Woodham Bros scrap yard on Barry Island in South Wales taken in 1967 when most of the engines were still intact. Many of the engines have now been restored.
  Mark Fry has emailed me with comments and amendments about this locomotive. These details have now been incorporated into this page.

His un-edited email appears below:

Thanks for sharing your photos of Portland railways. I have a couple of comments for you regarding the captions for your photos of 35018, on page railways4.htm. The locomotive is named "British India Line", but it was never owned by them. It was built by the Southern Railway and passed to British Railways in 1947. It was the first of the class to be rebuilt by BR - originally, the boiler was covered by an "air-smoothed" casing, causing them to be called "spam cans" by railwaymen. As you say, it was sold for scrap to Woodhams Bros of Barry in the 1960s, and before moving to Portland, it spend quite a long time on the Mid-Hants Railway ("The Watercress Line"). However, it was purchased from Barry privately and never belonged to the MHR. The establishment where it currently resides has no connection with the MHR, and it's almost certainly not correct to describe the place as "MHR Portland".

I hope this information is helpful to you. I've been a member of the Mid Hants Railway Preservation Society for more than 20 years and have followed 35018's progress with interest over the years.

Cheers
        Mark Fry

Thank you Mark

   

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